Fall 2015

Fall
2015
Undergraduate Courses

French in Translation Courses

FRTR 3584—Topics in French Cinema:  Masterpieces of French Cinema

 An introduction to masterpieces of French cinema, from the earliest short films of the Lumière Brothers and George Meliès, to feature-length works by Jean Cocteau, Jean-Luc Godard, Chris Marker, François Truffaut, Agnès Varda, and others. Students will study film genres and movements (Poetic Realism, the New Wave) in relation to social, cultural and aesthetic trends. They will also learn to identify and analyze film techniques (camera angle, camera movement, montage, and more). Students will view approximately one film/week, outside of class, complete accompanying reading assignments, participate in class discussion, write analytical papers, attend audiovisual workshops, and create original short video projects. All films are in French with English subtitles; all reading, writing, discussion, and audiovisual assignments are in English.

 Questions? Contact the professor: Alison Levine (alevine@virginia.edu)

TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm (Levine)

        
Advanced Courses in French

FREN 3030 – Phonetics

FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics, intended to present basic concepts in phonetic theory and teach students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. It includes an examination of the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (spelling); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and much more. Practical exercises in 'ear-training' and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential elements in this dynamic course.

Taught in French. Counts for major/minor credit in French and in Linguistics.

TR 11:00  AM - 12:15 PM (Saunders)
TR 12:30 PM– 1:45 PM (Saunders)

FREN 3031 –Finding Your Voice in French

Prerequisite: Completion of FREN 2020 or 2320; exemption from FREN 2020 by the UVA (F-Cape) Placement Test; a score of 3 on the AP French Language Exam; or a score of at least 660 on the SAT exam. FREN 3031 is a prerequisite for all undergraduate French courses at a higher level.

This course offers an opportunity for students to explore and develop their own “voice” in written and spoken French. Through reading and viewing a variety of cultural artifacts in French, and completing a series of individual and collaborative creative projects, students will have a chance to develop their own potential for self-expression. They will develop greater confidence in their communicative skills, command of grammar, and ability to revise and edit their own work. The course is conducted entirely in French.

MWF 10 – 10:50 (Rey)
MW 2:00 – 3:15 (Krueger)
MWF 12:00 – 12:50 (Zunz)
TR 11:00 – 12:15 (Labadie)
TR  9:30  - 10:45 (Labadie)

FREN 3032 – Image, Text, Culture

Prerequisite: French 3031. This course is a prerequisite for all French undergraduate courses on a higher level.

In this course, students will discover and engage critically with a broad sampling of French and Francophone cultural production representing a variety of periods, genres, approaches, and media.  Students will learn how to become more sensitive observers of French and Francophone culture, attuned to the nuances of content and form. They will read, watch, write about, and discuss a range of works that may include poetry, painting, prose, music, theater, films, graphic novels, photographs, essays, and historical documents. They will also make significant progress in their oral and written comprehension and communication in French.  The course is conducted entirely in French.

TR 2:00 – 3:15  (Lyu)

MW 3:30 – 4:45 (Ferguson)
MWF 11:00 – 11:50 (Geer)
TR 12:30-1:45 (Drame)

FREN 3034-001 - Advanced Oral and Written Expression in French

Prerequisite: Students must have completed French 3031 and French 3032 or their equivalent.

FREN 3034, which counts for major/minor credit, is an intensive course designed to improve the oral and written language skills of more advanced students. Assignments include discussions on topics of current interest, presentations, translations, and compositions. All materials are French- or Francophone-related. The course focuses on language development in a Francophone cultural context, so students can become familiar with French and Francophone cultures and comfortable expressing their viewpoints in French. Of course, consistent attendance and active participation are essential.

MWF 12:00 – 12:50 (Perrot)

FREN 3051 History and Civilization of France:  Revolution - 1945 Histoire et civilisation de la France contemporaine

Beginning with a study of the French Revolution, this course focuses on the cultural and historical influences that have shaped Modern France. We will explore the relationship between culture and political power, the changing role of government, and how ordinary men and women experienced social change. Readings will be drawn from primary documents, memoirs and secondary historical texts. Visual elements will be incorporated in this course as well as selected films.

Readings in this course will be done in both French and English. All lectures, discussions and writing will be done exclusively in French

Prerequisite: FREN 3032

TR 9:30 – 10:45 (Horne)

FREN 3559 – New Course in French Literature and General Linguistics: The Fictional Orient

French authors and artists created an imaginary Orient filled with harems, genies, princes, and crafty merchants -- a place of fantastic luxury and excessive cruelty. In this faraway dreamland, which included countries as disparate as Persia, Turkey, and India, the expectations of realistic writing were temporarily suspended. Through narrations by fictional foreigners, French writers were able to discuss controversial political and moral issues without openly criticizing their own country. Readings will begin with the first French translation of 1001 Nights and end with contemporary popular culture.

MW 3:30 – 4:45 (Tsien)

FREN: 3584-Topics in French Cinema: Great French Films - An introduction to masterpieces of French cinema, from the earliest short films of the Lumière Brothers and George Meliès, to feature-length works by Jean Cocteau, Jean-Luc Godard, Chris Marker, François Truffaut, Agnès Varda, and others. Students will study film genres and movements (Poetic Realism, the New Wave) in relation to social, cultural and aesthetic trends. They will also learn to identify and analyze film techniques (camera angle, camera movement, montage, and more). Students will view approximately one film/week, outside of class, complete accompanying reading assignments, participate in class discussion, write analytical papers, attend audiovisual workshops, and create original short video projects. Course taught in French.

MW 2:00 – 3:15 (Blatt)

FREN 3585-001 Topics in Cultural Studies:  North African Literature and Culture

La situation géographique des pays d’Afrique du Nord fait de cet ensemble un carrefour de multiples influences depuis l’antiquité. Bordé au sud par le Sahara, à l’ouest par l’océan atlantique, au nord par la mer méditerranée, il est rattaché à l’Asie à son extrémité nord-est par l’isthme de Suez. Les cultures et populations nord-africaines reflètent cette diversité d’influences qui n’ont jamais cessé de les irriguer depuis les premières invasions à la colonisation et jusqu’aux effets récents de la mondialisation. Nous aborderons les cultures de l’Afrique du Nord à travers des œuvres littéraires francophones qui nous mèneront de l’Egypte au Maroc, de l’histoire coloniale aux données actuelles, des religions à l’art. Books TBA.

TR 11:00 – 12:15 (Staff)
                  
FREN: 3585-002   - Topics in Cultural Studies:    Arts and the Nation: A History of French Patronage

In 1965, as the first French Minister of Culture, the award-winning author André Malraux called on his fellow citizens to adopt American patronage practices to complement the French tradition of sponsoring the arts. His speech incites a number of questions regarding cultural differences in supporting the arts as well as the role of government and the individual citizen in artistic creation. In France, the nation and the arts have always been firmly intertwined. It might as easily be said that the nation created its artists as it can be argued that the arts shaped the nation. This class will offer a transhistoric survey, from medieval to modern, of governmental policies regarding the arts and the ensuing debates that have contributed to France’s distinctive approach to artistic sponsorship. The arts will be broadly defined, allowing us to examine issues ranging from the invention of the museum to the politics of national monuments to the complex history of poet-patron relations. We will address such topics as propaganda, censorship and creative freedom; the “poète engagé” as the nation’s moral voice and often challenger; the development of copyright law and the artist’s rights; gender and patronage; creative collaboration; and current state subvention programs, especially in relation to French cinema and music. In every case, we will combine study of historical and cultural practices with the reflections of artists, authors, and philosophers on these matters. This course will extend beyond France’s unique relationship to the arts to consider American patronage practices, whether through reference to the NEA, private foundations, or the new phenomenon of crowdfunding represented by Kickstarter.

12:30 pm – 1:45 pm  TR (McGrady)

FREN 4031 – Grammaire et Style

Prerequisites: B+ average in FREN 3031, 3032, and or instructor permission.

Survey of the main tools and techniques of translation. Written and oral translation exercises to and from the target language. Text selections will vary.

Taught in French.

MWF 10:00 – 10:50 (Zunz)

FREN 4410 – The Enlightenment

The Enlightenment, or Les Lumières, was one of the most important movements in Western intellectual history. Its proponents fought against superstition and a corrupt monarchy with notoriously witty essays and with fictions that seemed, on the surface, to be about sentimentality, sex, or exotic lands. In this course, we will consider how famous philosophes such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau brought France into a new era and inadvertently inspired the American and then the French Revolutions. We will examine how their writings treated issues such as: slavery, women's sexuality, blasphemy, the conflict between religion and science, and moral relativism among various countries. We will also focus on strategies used by the authors to hide their provocative ideas from government censors.

MW 2:00-3:15 (Tsien)

FREN 4582: Baudelaire et la modernité

Nous lirons une sélection de textes de Baudelaire (Les Fleurs du mal, Les Petits poèmes en prose, Les Paradis artificiels, et les critiques d'art) pour apprécier l'ensemble de la production littéraire de l'un des poètes les plus célébrés dans la culture occidentale. Nous procèderons par des lectures et des analyses attentives et examinerons la sensibilité et l'esthétique de la modernité baudelairienne: le problème du mal et l'éthique de la poésie, la structure et la destructuration de la forme poétique, et la question de l'inspiration et de la lucidité dans l'entreprise poétique. De façon plus générale, nous nous intéresserons à la nature et au pouvoir du langage poétique ainsi qu'à la relation entre la poésie et la vie.

Prerequisite: au moins un cours de littérature, culture, ou de cinéma au-delà de 3032 avec une note minimale de B+.

TR 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm (Lyu)

FREN 4585 -  Advanced Topics in Cultural Studies:   Topic: Laicite:  The Secular Tradition in France

One 3000-level culture or literature course beyond FREN 3032 and FREN 3034.

Arguably, France is the most adamantly secular country in Europe today. Particularly in the aftermath of the “Charlie Hebdo” and “Hyper Kasher” tragedies of January 2015, the French tradition of secularism--known as la laicité -is receiving increased public attention as a pillar of the French Republic. Yet controversies persist: do the French agree on the meaning of laicité? A recent law forbids the wearing of the burqa—and other articles of clothing that cover the face- in public. The Islamic headscarf and other religious symbols have been banned from public secondary schools since 2004. How can we, as Americans, understand la laicité and the issues it raises? What can we learn about French culture and history if we analyze it closely? Beginning with a discussion of the main themes of this contemporary debate, we will take a longer view and study the historical, cultural, and philosophical context that shaped this distinctive form of secularism.

Topics of study will include: the history of church/state relations in France; the legacy of the French revolution; anticlericalism; immigration and the evolution of public versus private identities; the defense and (re)definition of the secular state in modern France.

 TR 11:00 – 12:15 (Horne)